FANDOM


(Created page with "<div class="quote"> Blademaster Jauffre wrote: Well the Way of the Voice became a commonly practised thing amongst Nords. So using the Thu'um in Nord culture for warfare basi...")
 
 
Line 25: Line 25:
 
I thought the Thu'um wasn't widely used because it was so hard to learn. I get your point, though - not a common weapon. Ulfric himself says he didn't need the Thu'um to kill Torygg; he was making a point with it. (Personally, I think it's akin to bringing a bazooka to a sword fight, but that's me.)
 
I thought the Thu'um wasn't widely used because it was so hard to learn. I get your point, though - not a common weapon. Ulfric himself says he didn't need the Thu'um to kill Torygg; he was making a point with it. (Personally, I think it's akin to bringing a bazooka to a sword fight, but that's me.)
   
So would the duel have been considered fair if it wouldn't have happened immediately... if Torygg would have had time to prepare? Or would it be more likely the Magistrates would have prevented the duel from occurring, and ignored Ulfric's challenge entirely?
+
So would the duel have been considered fair if it wouldn't have happened immediately... if Torygg would have had time to prepare? Or would it be more likely the Magistrates would have prevented the duel from occurring, and ignored Ulfric's challenge entirely? I ask because Ulfric seems like an intelligent man, and it surprises me he would use a tactic that could be so easily challenged.

Latest revision as of 03:36, May 11, 2016

Blademaster Jauffre wrote:

Well the Way of the Voice became a commonly practised thing amongst Nords. So using the Thu'um in Nord culture for warfare basically died off.

Now, a duel is, both according to Imperial and Nordic rule, a fight to the death OR (as Admiral Richton stated) when the losing side surrenders. Some may say there's some sort of Old Nord duel but this is a myth, without evidence. Now, Ulfric killed Torygg, while you might say that it was a fight to the death so it was justified. In short, this is the duel:

  • Imperials and Nord alike recognize a noble's obligation to answer a challenge of honor.
  • Once a challenge is issued, the higher the rank of the party is, the higher the obligation to fight.
  • If the victim (in this case, Torygg) was bullied, intimidated, or goaded by a stronger party (in this case, Ulfric) with suspect motives, magistrates often convict the stronger party (Ulfric) of foul murder.


So according to the rules of engagement Ulfric did murder Torygg.

1. He goaded Torygg by challenging him in combat, had Torygg denied he would have lost his position and a lot of respect, this would also have caused a new Moot to be set. 

2. Ulfric was (obviously) the stronger party, having fought against the Reachmen and the Dominion. While Torygg only had martial training. 

3. Ulfric was suspected to want to usurp Torygg's throne. Later dialogue with Ulfric himself also adds up to -- but doesn't (directly) confirm -- this. Seeing as he already starts acting like the High King before the Moot occurs.

I thought the Thu'um wasn't widely used because it was so hard to learn. I get your point, though - not a common weapon. Ulfric himself says he didn't need the Thu'um to kill Torygg; he was making a point with it. (Personally, I think it's akin to bringing a bazooka to a sword fight, but that's me.)

So would the duel have been considered fair if it wouldn't have happened immediately... if Torygg would have had time to prepare? Or would it be more likely the Magistrates would have prevented the duel from occurring, and ignored Ulfric's challenge entirely? I ask because Ulfric seems like an intelligent man, and it surprises me he would use a tactic that could be so easily challenged.

*Disclosure: Some of the links above are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, Fandom will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.