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Quotebg
"All are guilty until they have proven themselves innocent."
Marukh[src]

Imperial Law, also known as Tamrielan Law, is the law system in place in the Third Empire of Tamriel. Each of its provinces follow at least the basics of the law,[1] though exceptions for laws can be made under certain circumstances, such as with Morrowind and the Treaty of the Armistice.

Imperial law bookEdit

A book detailing Tamrielan Law can be found in The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall. Its name being Legal Basics.

Law enforcementEdit

RegulationsEdit

The fines for commiting crimes are determind by magistrates, as is the compensation.[4][5] Magistrates also judge cases and determine prison sentences for crimes.[5] Criminals may pay these fines to members of the law enforcement. If the criminal chooses to endure a jail sentence, they are tasked with doing heavy labor in workcamps.[4] It is often expected that criminals who chose to follow a jail sentence lose some of their experience in skills as a result of physical, mental, or emotional punishment.[4]

People who are considered outlaws have no rights. As such, these people may be killed, or stolen from,[6] without scandal or sanction. Officers in the line of duty are allowed to use deadly force in order to put down outlaws.[7]

Upon being caught, criminals are brought to a court where their verdict is announced. Criminals can go to jail and serve their time, or pay the court a fine and be let go. In both circumstances, criminals are searched of any stolen goods, which are taken from them and gathered as evidence.[8] During the Third Era the two Doyens of the Cyrodiilic Thieves Guild, known as Armand Christophe and S'Krivva had special arrangements with the guards and judges within the province, enabling them to half the cost of the bounty for Thieves Guild members who paid them.[9] Within Cyrodiil itself, legal counsel is available to those who seek it.[10]

Laws and punishmentsEdit

  • Imperial Law protects salvaged Dwemer artifacts from being sold, being noted as property of the Emperor.[11][12] Though trade in these artifacts is allowed with the proper charter.[6]
  • Imperial Law supports and protects the Imperial Cult.[13]
  • Argonians and Khajiits freed from slavery have the rights of citizens.[14][15][note 1]
  • Piracy, sedition and treason[17] are punished by summary execution.[18]
  • Murdering a tax collector is punished by death.[19]
  • Verbal assault, pickpocketing, and trespassing are minor crimes, punished by fines or hard labor.[4] Verbal assault and pickpocketing are often fined with fines and compensation of less than 100 Septims.[20]
  • Theft and foul murder are felonies. The fine for theft depends on the value of the property stolen, or hard labor. Foul murder is fined with at least 1000 Septims, or hard labor.[4]
    • Stealing from the Imperial Legion is a crime punished by death.[21]
  • Brawling, and murder are crimes under Imperial Law,[4] and often paid off through a fine or with hard labor.[22][23][24] Murder can also be punished by death or imprisonment.[20]
  • Killing of people considered heretics is against Imperial Law.[7]
  • Slavery is illegal throughout the Empire.[20][note 2]
  • Imperial Law states killing is fair in war, self-defense, defense of property, affairs of honor, and sanctioned affairs of state. Other killings are considered murder.[20]
  • Dunmer are allowed to make use of necromancy to bind their dead to sacred or family property.[25]
    • Other means of necromancy are illegal in Morrowind.[25]
  • In the rest of the Empire, both body and spirit are protected as property, and are not allowed to be used without the owner's permission. Displaying the undead is widely prohibited. Necromancy itself is, however, not really illegal. Mages are allowed to legally purchase corpses and souls for philosophical research, and are allowed to do with these as they wish in private.[25]
  • Skooma is an illegal narcotic.[26][27]
  • Imperial public policy supports religious tolerance.[28]

AppearancesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. This law applied to Morrowind, in which slavery was still legal during the late-Third Era.
  2. With exception of Morrowind due to the Armistice, until Helseth Hlaalu outlawed slavery.

References

  1. Legal Basics
  2. Dialogue with Tappius Esdrecus
  3. citizens of the Empire dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Imperial Law dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  5. 5.0 5.1 law in Morrowind dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  6. 6.0 6.1 little advice dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  7. 7.0 7.1 killing and murder dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  8. Events of being arrested by members of the City Watch in The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
  9. Dialogue with Ongar the World-Weary
  10. Legal Basics
  11. Dwemer artifacts dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  12. Dwemer ruins dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  13. Imperial cult dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  14. Argonian dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  15. Khajiit dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  16. Black Marsh dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  17. Dialogue with Tienius Delitian during "Evidence of Conspiracy"
  18. Dialogue with Amiel Richton
  19. Events of Death of a Taxman
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 Morrowind lore dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  21. Dialogue with Saenus Lusius during "Frostmoth Smugglers"
  22. Events of The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  23. Events of The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
  24. Events of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 necromancy dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  26. skooma dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  27. Smuggling dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
  28. Daedra worship dialogue topic in The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
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