FANDOM


Woodcutter's Axe

The Source Editor being used to edit the Woodcutter's Axe page.

Editing is the process by which users contribute to The Elder Scrolls Wiki. This page serves as reference for new editors to learn the syntax of Source Mode. You're best off reading a bit, then experimenting with editing yourself on an article or sandbox, and then coming back to read more: don't try to absorb it all at once! And don't worry about breaking anything either.

If you're completely new to editing and just want to learn the basics, the "Critical skills" tab contains a list of the most important sections of the guide. You might also be interested in our glossary, which explains some wiki jargon. Likewise, please change your preferred editor from "Visual" (the default) to "Source" in your preferences.

If you're viewing this from the app, be aware that some of the formatting may appear differently from how it does on PC. If you're attempting to create a link to this page on Discussions, omit the "User:" prefix or else the link won't work on the mobile app. Note that this guide should supplement (not replace) the policies and guidelines and style and formatting guides, which are designed to explain the rules and requirements for articles.

Source Editor

Switching to Source

The default editor on Wikia is the Visual Editor, which happens to be very buggy. It also somewhat limits what you can edit, especially with more advanced templates. While Visual may be a helpful way to introduce new editors to the wiki, in the long run it's better to use the Source Editor whenever possible.

Here's how you switch your editor to Source:

  1. Go to Special:Preferences
  2. Click the "Editing" tab
  3. Find the "Preferred editor" dropdown under "Editing experience"
  4. Select "Source editor"
  5. Scroll down and hit "Save"

Now, whenever you click the edit button on an article, you'll automatically be able to look at the Source code instead of the Visual Editor. If for some reason you wish to make an edit in Visual at this point, you can click the arrow next to the edit button and hit "VisualEditor."

Syntax highlighting

You'll notice in the Source Editor that certain parts of the page are highlighted by color. This is a way to quickly distinguish between regular text and templates, links, tags, and other code. This can be a very useful visual indicator of what's happening in an article. If you want to toggle this option, this is how you do it:

  1. Go to Special:Preferences
  2. Click the "Editing" tab
  3. Find the "Editing experience" header
  4. Check/uncheck "Do not show syntax highlighting in Source mode"
  5. Scroll down and hit "Save"

If you check the box, syntax highlighting won't display while editing normal articles. This may make the code harder to understand, but it's down to personal preference. Note that MediaWiki pages will still display syntax highlighting when you're viewing the code without editing.

Mobile editing

Most people use computers or laptops to edit, but it's completely possible to contribute to the wiki from a mobile device. Simply launch a web browser, such as Google Chrome or Safari, and search for the wiki or an article on it. You'll probably be directed to the mobile version of the wiki. The mobile skin doesn't have any editing functionality right now (although it might in the future).

Scroll to the very bottom of the page you're on and hit the "View full site" button. This will reformat the page to the desktop layout, which allows you to edit more effectively. If using the aforementioned button has no effect, add the phrase ?useskin=oasis to the end of the page's URL to manually force the desktop skin.

Languages

In addition to Wikitext and HTML, markup languages, editors sometimes use CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and JS (JavaScript). Having a good understanding of Wikitext and HTML is very important to editing in Source; CSS and JS can be helpful, especially when designing templates and writing scripts, but aren't strictly necessary for editing most content articles. For bot operation, a basic understanding of Regex can be useful.

Wikitext

Wikitext is a unique markup format designed for use on wikis. While HTML primarily uses tags to format content, wikitext is fairly varied. Wikitext formatting will be discussed in greater detail in later sections of this guide, as it's the most prevalent type of formatting on the wiki. Here are a few examples of it:

[[Link]]
''Italics''
*List
{{Template}}

HTML

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is commonly used to structure text and images through various tags. For example, while wikitext gives you the ability to italicize text with two apostrophes, this can also be accomplished through HTML by using the italics tag, <i>. Wikitext is generally preferred when possible, but HTML offers a wider range of functionality overall. Here are a few examples of it:

<a href>
<div class="blockquote">
<code>
<br />

An HTML tutorial may be found here.

CSS

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is sometimes used to format wikitext/HTML content on wiki pages. This can be done "inline" alongside a wikitext/HTML element (common), or in a separate MediaWiki CSS file on the wiki (uncommon). Here are a few examples of inline CSS:

{|class="wikitable" style="text-align: center;"
<h2 style="color:blue;">Blue Header</h2>
<span style="font-size:12.0pt"; font-family:"Arial">

A CSS tutorial may be found here.

JS

JavaScript (JS) is occasionally used in MediaWiki files to do something functional that can't be accomplished with only HTML and CSS. You don't have to worry about it. Here's an example of it, if you're interested:

importArticles({
    type: "script",
    articles: [
        "MediaWiki:Common.js/PersistentHeaders.js", /* Scrolling table headers ~Flightmare*/
        "u:dev:RevealAnonIP/code.js",
        "u:deadisland:User:Jgjake2/js/ElderScrolls/Popups.js", /*Popup script  ~Jgjake2*/
        "MediaWiki:Common.js/collapse.js" /*Collapsibles ~HaLo2FrEeEk*/
    ]
});

A JS tutorial may be found here.

Regex

Regex (short for "regular expressions") is a system that can be used to make relatively advanced searches on the wiki by defining particular search patterns. Regex isn't a true programming language itself, but is most often used to complete "find and replace" work with bots as well as to catch vandalism and other undesirable content through abuse filters. Here are a few examples of it:

(word1|word2)
\|\s*word1\s*=[^\|\r\n]*[\r\n]+
(?=[\d\D]*word1)(?=[\d\D]*word2)(?=[\d\D]*word3)

Critical skills

The following sections are the most important for those who are just beginning to learn how to edit in Source.

  • 5.0 Links – The pathways connecting articles on the wiki; integral to all pages
    • 5.1: General links – Normal links used for content articles
    • 5.2: Pipe links – Links that display different content than they point to
    • 5.3: Extra link text – Formatting practices for some basic links
    • 5.4: External links – Links pointing outside of Wikia
    • 5.5: External pipe links – Displaying different content than the URL of an external link
    • 5.6: Same-page links – Linking to somewhere further down (or up) the current page
    • 5.7: Sub-page links – Linking to a sub-page of an overarching article sharing its name
    • 5.8: Special links – Linking to other namespaces
    • 5.9: Interlanguage links – Linking to versions of the wiki written in foreign languages
    • 5.10: Interwiki links – Linking to other wikis on the Wikia or Wikipedia network
  • 6.0: Categories – Organizational keywords serving to classify every mainspace article on the wiki
  • 7.0: Formatting – Various ways to format the text of an article
    • 7.1: Simple formatting – The most basic text formatting actions, such as italics
    • 7.2: Headings – Partitioning an article into coherent sections for organizational purposes
    • 7.3: Indentations – Creating whitespace to the left of a block of text
    • 7.4: Line breaks – Placing text immediately below other text, without skipping a line
    • 7.5: Lists – Using bullets or a numbered list to separate content into a list
  • 8.0: References – Citing article content; essential for the encyclopedia to succeed
  • 9.0: Templates – Code used to display more advanced content on articles
    • 9.1: Infoboxes – Boxes of quick info placed on the top of most content articles
    • 9.2: Appearance templates – Templates to display game names more efficiently
    • 9.3: Quote templates – Code to quote written or spoken content
    • 9.4: Stub templates – Notices of an article's need for expansion
  • 10.0: Media – Files uploaded to the wiki such as images and audio
    • 10.1: Images – Various ways to format images on articles

Note that the sections listed above only cover the most common formatting syntax on the wiki: there's still a significant amount of additional material explained in the guide that may be useful to new editors.

Things to edit

This isn't a complete list, but here are links to a few categories containing articles that need your help. Many of these categories have subcategories based on the game or type of page it is, which you can use to further narrow down what you want to help out with. You can add pages to many of these categories yourself through the use of a maintenance template.

Content

Maintenance

Main article: Category:Maintenance

Cached lists

Main article: Special:SpecialPages

Links

General links

Links are used to access different pages on the wiki. A word or series of words is linked by adding [[ before it and ]] after it. Here are some examples:

*[[Skyrim]]
*[[Nordic Empire]]
*[[Ruins of Kemel-Ze]]

This would make:

The bullets you see to the left are created by placing an asterisk * before a word on a new line. They're optional, but are commonly used in lists.

Pipe links

On many articles, however, links appear as different words than the name of the page that they link to. This is called pipe-linking. Here's how you do it:

*[[Skyrim|The Fatherland]]
*[[Nordic Empire|First Empire of the Nords]]
*[[Ruins of Kemel-Ze|This book]]

This would make:

Extra link text

Sometimes, the way a sentence is worded will require you to make a link in plural, past tense, and so on. Instead of using a pipe link, there's another way to make a link show the grammatically correct text while still pointing to the proper page. Here's how you do it:

*[[Redguard]]s
*[[Enchant]]ed
*[[Magic]]al

This would make:

As you can see, the "Redguards" link simply points to Redguard; "Enchanted" to Enchant; and "Magical" to Magic. This is useful for keeping link coding orderly.

External links

If you wish to make an external link, this is how you do it:

[http://www.elderscrolls.com/]

This would make:

http://www.elderscrolls.com/

External pipe links

For an external pipe link, you add a space after the final character in the URL of the outside page you're linking to and type what you want the reader to see. Here's how you do it:

[http://www.elderscrolls.com/ Bethesda's official site]

This would make:

Bethesda's official site

Same-page links

Occasionally, especially on lengthier pages, you may want to link to a different section of the page you're already on, so that readers do not have to scroll around to find it. This type of link also does not reload the page, making it a quick and easy solution. Here's how you do it:

[[User:Atvelonis/Editing#Special links]]

This would make:

User:Atvelonis/Editing#Special links

Alternatively, this can be shortened to simply a pound sign # and the heading name. Here's how you do it:

[[#Special links]]

This would have the same result:

#Special links

Sub-page links

Some pages are so extensive that they require what are called sub-pages, indicated with a forward slash / followed by a descriptive title, which are connected by the article's overarching prefix.

For example, the Console Commands (Skyrim) article relies on sub-pages for better organization. In this case, they're used to separate lists of IDs for various things in the game. Here's how you use these links:

*[[Console Commands (Skyrim)/Books]]
*[[Console Commands (Skyrim)/Characters]]
*[[Console Commands (Skyrim)/Locations]]

This would make:

Remember that these are all sub-pages of the main Console Commands (Skyrim) page. If you're on the "hub" page for a bunch of sub-pages, there's a way to link to the sub-pages more neatly. Here's how you do it:

*[[/Books]]
*[[/Characters]]
*[[/Locations]]

This would make:

Keep in mind that this only works if you're on the main hub page for the sub-pages. Otherwise, you'd have to write out the full link.

Special links

Special links are links to any pages that have a prefix. This includes Project, Special, MediaWiki, Forum, File (see below), and so on. To make a special link, simply add the prefix before the name of the page in the link. Here's how you do it:

*[[Special:ListFiles]]
*[[MediaWiki:Common.css]]
*[[Forum:Index]]

This would make:

It's the same process for most other namespaces. Forum links, however, are treated slightly differently. Instead of writing the name of the forum thread in a link, you use the thread number, which can be found in the page's URL. Here's how you do it:

[[Thread:380847]]

This would make:

Thread:380847

Another exception can be the Project namespace, which can be lengthened to "The Elder Scrolls Wiki:" or shortened to "TES:." Here's how you do it:

*[[Project:Weekly Updates]]
*[[The Elder Scrolls Wiki:Weekly Updates]]
*[[TES:Weekly Updates]]

This would make:

These links all do the same thing, although "TES:" is the most compact and as such is used most frequently.

Interlanguage links

The wiki exists in multiple other languages, so linking articles in English to ones in German, Spanish, Russan, and so on is very useful to non-English speakers. These links are placed at the bottom of articles and include the ISO 639-1 language codes as a prefix and then the name of the article in the corresponding language after that. Here's how you do it:

[[de:Ulfric Sturmmantel]]
[[es:Ulfric Capa de la Tormenta]]
[[ru:Ульфрик Буревестник]]

This would add links to the Ulfric Stormcloak article to its respective pages on the German (de), Spanish (es), and Russian (ru) TESWikis. A list of existing interlanguage TESWikis can be found here and a list of ISO 639-1 language codes can be found here.

Interwiki links

It's also possible to link to both another wiki on Wikia or something on Wikipedia by using special prefixes. To link to another wiki on Wikia, you must type "w:c:<wikiname>:" and then the article title. When linking to Community Central, you only need to type ":w:" and then the article title. For Wikipedia, simply write "Wikipedia:" as the prefix, followed by the article title. Here are some examples:

*[[:w:Community Central]]
*[[w:c:fallout:Sanctuary Hills]]
*[[wikipedia:Europe]]

This would make:

And of course, those links can be turned into pipe links just as any other links would be.

Redirects

Redirects are a special kind of link frequently used to improve coherence in article source code. In pages with a lot of links, including a longer pipe link may be cumbersome and mildly distracting to editors. Therefore, redirect links can be used in place of a pipe link.

For example, the link ESO actually points to the The Elder Scrolls Online article. So, when an ESO link is clicked, the reader is automatically directed to the full article (in other words, it works just like a normal link).

So, instead of having to type out [[The Elder Scrolls Online|ESO]] every time you want to use that abbreviation, you can simply type [[ESO]] and it'll have the same effect. Here's the code on the ESO redirect page that makes it point to the The Elder Scrolls Online article:

#REDIRECT [[The Elder Scrolls Online]]

Furthermore, a redirect is automatically created when a file or article is renamed. For example, if you rename the file "Jarl Balgruuf the Greater.png" to "Ballin' Balgruuf.png," there'll be a redirect from the old title to the new one, in case you forget to update the links. Even if the file redirect is used instead of the new title, it displays the same image.

Categories

Categories are keywords placed at the bottom of most articles to group similar articles together to help readers and editors find other articles which could also help them.

They can be added in three ways. First, to click the "Add category" button at the bottom of an article, and type in the name of the category. The second way is to go into the editor and add the name of the desired category via the category module on the bottom right (may be disabled through the editing tab in Special:Preferences). The third way is to manually add it like a link in the main body of the article. Here are some examples:

[[Category:Skyrim: Characters]]
[[Category:Online: Books]]
[[Category:Lore: Events]]

If you want to simply link to a category from an article, place a colon in between the first set of brackets and the name of the category. Here are some examples:

[[:Category:Skyrim: Characters]]
[[:Category:Online: Books]]
[[:Category:Lore: Events]]

This would make:

Category:Skyrim: Characters
Category:Online: Books
Category:Lore: Events

Formatting

Simple formatting

On most articles, there are three different types of text. Regular, unmodified text, bolded text, italicized text, underline text, and strikeout text. Some articles have more advanced types of text, which will be explained below. Here's how simple formatting code works:

*This is plain text.
*<b>This is bolded text.</b>
*<i>This is italicized text.</i>
*<u>This is underlined text.</u>
*<s>This is struckout text.</s>

This would make:

  • This is plain text.
  • This is bolded text.
  • This is italicized text.
  • This is underlined text.
  • This is struckout text.

Additionally, italics can be created with two apostrophes '' in the place of the <i> and </i>, and bold can be created with three apostrophes ''' in the place of the <b> and </b>, respectively. Both are accepted methods, but apostrophes are generally preferred where applicable.

Headings

Headings, such as the one directly above this paragraph, are used to separate different topics in an article. They're created by adding == before and after a word or phrase. Additional, smaller headings can be created by adding more equals signs. Here's how you do it:

==Heading==
===Subheading 1===
====Subheading 2====
=====Subheading 3=====

After four or more headings are introduced to an article, a Table of Contents is automatically created to help readers easily skip to specific sections.

Indentations

To make an indentation, place a colon before the text you wish to indent. The more colons you add, the more indented it'll become. It's often used to document in-game dialogue or to reply to another editor's message on a talk page. Here's how you do it:

This line is not indented.
:This line is indented once.
::This line is indented twice.
:::This line is indented three times.
::::This line is indented four times.
:::::This line is indented five times.

This would make:

This line is not indented.

This line is indented once.
This line is indented twice.
This line is indented three times.
This line is indented four times.
This line is indented five times.

Line breaks

There are two ways to create a line break. The first way, to simply press the Enter/Return key on your keyboard twice, is used for new paragraphs and leaves a space in between. Here's how you do it:

This is in the first paragraph.

This is in the second paragraph.

This would make:

This is in the first paragraph.

This is in the second paragraph.

The second way to make a line break leaves no space and is often used in infoboxes. Here's how you do it:

This is on the first line.<br />
This is on the second line.

This would make:

This is on the first line.
This is on the second line.

Lists

There are several ways to format lists on the wiki. The most common is via bullets (unordered list), which are created with asterisks *. Here's how you do it:

*This is part of a bulleted list.
*This is part of a bulleted list.
*This is part of a bulleted list.

This would make:

  • This is part of a bulleted list.
  • This is part of a bulleted list.
  • This is part of a bulleted list.

Alternatively, you can number lists by using a pound sign # instead of an asterisk (ordered list). Here's how you do it:

#This is part of a numbered list.
#This is part of a numbered list.
#This is part of a numbered list.

This would make:

  1. This is part of a numbered list.
  2. This is part of a numbered list.
  3. This is part of a numbered list.

Columns

On some articles, lists are extremely long and become difficult to read. To solve this, we use multiple columns for the list; usually no more than three. To make for example a two-column list, you would use "2" as an argument within the following:

<div style="{{column-count|2}}">
*This is in the first column.
*This is in the first column.
*This is in the first column.
*This is in the second column.
*This is in the second column.
*This is in the second column.
</div>

This would make:

  • This is in the first column.
  • This is in the first column.
  • This is in the first column.
  • This is in the second column.
  • This is in the second column.
  • This is in the second column.

Sub

Occasionally, an article may call for text to be formatted with the "sub" tag, meaning subscript. Here's an example:

H<sub>2</sub>O is abundant in the [[Abecean Sea]].

This would make:

H2O is abundant in the Abecean Sea.

Sup

Likewise, text must be raised to represent for example a squared or cubed number or a trademarked or registered symbol. This can be done with sup, meaning superscript. Here's an example:

There are over 10<sup>4</sup> characters in ''[[The Elder Scrolls Online]]''.

This would make:

There are over 104 characters in The Elder Scrolls Online.

Small

Text size can also be decreased for a variety of situations. Here's how you do it:

<small>This is small text.</small>

This would make:

This is small text.

Nowiki

Occasionally, you might have to write out the code for something as an example to show someone else without without making it function. Here's an example:

<nowiki>{{For|2=Fish}}</nowiki>

This would make:

{{For|2=Fish}}

Code

Code works exactly the same way as nowiki, except it changes the font of anything within it to a new one to differentiate from regular text. Here's an example:

<code>moveto.player 0001E745</code>

This would make:

moveto.player 0001E745

Pre

You may want to show the code for something but make it very obvious. Pre works the same way as nowiki and code, but produces a significantly more noticeable code area. It's very prevalent in this guide for this very reason. To use pre, place <pre> before the code and </pre> after it. Here's an example:

Code!

Poem

Some topics, especially songs, poems, or inscriptions, have a specific format that we have to recreate. Although a new line can be created with <br />, it's sometimes impractical to use it over and over again in the case of lengthier works, and can't be used to align text horizontally. Using <poem> before a document </poem> after it creates the poem format. Here's an example:

<poem>
Dovahkiin, Dovahkiin, naal ok zin los vahriin,
Wah dein vokul mahfaeraak ahst vaal!
Ahrk fin norok paal graan fod nust hon zindro zaan,
Dovahkiin, fah hin kogaan mu draal!
</poem>

This would make:

Dovahkiin, Dovahkiin, naal ok zin los vahriin,
Wah dein vokul mahfaeraak ahst vaal!
Ahrk fin norok paal graan fod nust hon zindro zaan,
Dovahkiin, fah hin kogaan mu draal!

Of course, this text can be manipulated to appear in italics, bold, underline, and so on. Here's an example:

<i>
<poem>
Dovahkiin, Dovahkiin, naal ok zin los vahriin,
Wah dein vokul mahfaeraak ahst vaal!
Ahrk fin norok paal graan fod nust hon zindro zaan,
Dovahkiin, fah hin kogaan mu draal!
</poem>
</i>

This would make:

Dovahkiin, Dovahkiin, naal ok zin los vahriin,
Wah dein vokul mahfaeraak ahst vaal!
Ahrk fin norok paal graan fod nust hon zindro zaan,
Dovahkiin, fah hin kogaan mu draal!

Most tags, including <poem>, can be manipulated with inline CSS to do slightly different things, such as to center text. Here's an example:

<i>
<poem style="text-align: center;">
Dovahkiin, Dovahkiin, naal ok zin los vahriin,
Wah dein vokul mahfaeraak ahst vaal!
Ahrk fin norok paal graan fod nust hon zindro zaan,
Dovahkiin, fah hin kogaan mu draal!
</poem>
</i>

This would make:

Dovahkiin, Dovahkiin, naal ok zin los vahriin,
Wah dein vokul mahfaeraak ahst vaal!
Ahrk fin norok paal graan fod nust hon zindro zaan,
Dovahkiin, fah hin kogaan mu draal!

Colored text

To make text colored, you must use HTML color codes. Here's how you do it:

*<span style="color:#FF0000">This text is red.</span>
*<span style="color:#FFA500">This text is orange.</span>
*<span style="color:#FFFF00">This text is yellow.</span>
*<span style="color:#00FF00">This text is green.</span>
*<span style="color:#0000FF">This text is blue.</span>
*<span style="color:#4B0082">This text is indigo.</span>
*<span style="color:#EE82EE">This text is violet.</span>

This would make:

There are thousands of HTML color codes, all of which can be found across the internet at various websites. The examples to the left are only a small sample of the colors that can be used.
  • This text is red.
  • This text is orange.
  • This text is yellow.
  • This text is green.
  • This text is blue.
  • This text is indigo.
  • This text is violet.

Some common color names, such as "red" and "green," can be used in lieu of the hex codes.

Comments

You can leave HTML comments for other editors in the source code in order to communicate an issue or other relevant information about the article without making it visible to readers. Here's how you do it:

<!--Interwiki links-->

Poll

A poll of any length for readers and editors can be created with HTML tags. Although not used on articles, it's useful to gauge preliminary support for a rule change or general debate, for example. Here's how you do it:

<poll>
Question
Option 1
Option 2
Option 3
</poll>

An example of a poll can be found on the bottom part of the right rail of the wiki's Main Page.

Tabber

Information can be separated by different tabs with the <tabber> tag, for example on the Main Page. Here's how you do it:

<tabber>
Tab 1 Name=
Tab 1 Content
|-|
Tab 2 Name=
Tab 2 Content
|-|
Tab 3 Name=
Tab 3 Content
</tabber>

This would make:

Tab 1 Content

Tab 2 Content

Tab 3 Content

After a certain number of tabs are added, they will start to stack vertically. Although still usable in this form, the tab names can become difficult to read and select.

References

Licensed references

References are extremely important to use on articles, lore articles in particular, to show readers where the information on the page is coming from. They're added with a short <ref> tag at the end of a sentence. Here's how you do it:

Uriel V died in 3E 290.<ref>''[[The Third Era Timeline]]''</ref>

On its own, this wouldn't actually do anything. If you left it like this, you'd see the following message at the bottom of the page:

Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found

To fix this, you must add the template {{Refs}} at the bottom of the article. This adds the </references> tag that is needed as well as a ==References== header. Here's how you do it:

{{Refs}}

Unlicensed references

We separate licensed sources from unlicensed sources in the References section for more specificity for readers. They work basically the same way as regular references, but they also include something to note that they're unlicensed references. Here's how you do it:

Landfall is a future event in which Nirn is destroyed.<ref group="UL">''[[C0DA]]''</ref>

If you left this on its own, you'd see the following message at the bottom of the page:

Cite error: <ref> tags exist for a group named "UL", but no corresponding <references group="UL"/> tag was found.

To fix this, you'd also have to add the template {{UL}} and a special tag underneath that for it to also record the unlicensed references. Here's how you do it:

{{UL}}
<references group="UL"/>

If you have both licensed and unlicensed references, you would add everything. Here's how you do it:

{{Refs}}
{{UL}}
<references group="UL"/>

Grouping references

References can be grouped in any number of ways. This is the same process used for unlicensed references, however instead of writing "UL" as the group, you'd write whatever you want the group to be called. This allows for multiple reference groups to exist on the same article simultaneously. Here's how you do it:

The weapon can be acquired by…<ref group="note">This only works if you're an Argonian.</ref>

Near the bottom of the article, you'd create a separate section for "Notes," where you'd include a tag matching the group you created. Here's how you do it:

<references group="note"/>

Naming references

On many occasions, references will be used multiple times on a single article. Adding the reference normally to each sentence it applies to would become repetitive very quickly. To avoid this, you would include a tag of your choosing to signify that two references are the same. Here's an example:

Uriel V died in 3E 290.<ref name="Timeline">''[[The Third Era Timeline]]''</ref>

Later, when you want to add the reference again, you'd do the following for the next sentence:

The Oblivion Crisis happened in 4E 433.<ref name="Timeline"/>

Reflist

If the number of references on a page is fairly large, you may want to consider splitting up the references section into two or more columns, similar to regular columns. However, this is slightly easier to do. Here's how you do it:

{{Reflist|2}}

This would make a two-column list. If there are a huge number of references, three columns are sometimes used, but rarely any more than that. Also note that if you use {{Reflist}}, you must add the ==References== column manually, as it's not included in the template, unlike with {{Refs}}.

Templates

Templates are used to place something code-heavy like an infobox or navbar into articles in a concise way. They're represented in text by two braces {{ before the name of the template and two braces }} afterwards.

Infoboxes

Infoboxes appear on the top-right of most articles and are used to store images and key information. Each new piece of information is represented on a new line by a vertical line | , a word or two noting what this piece of information is (called the "variable" or "parameter"), and an equals sign = , immediately after which comes the information itself (called the "argument"). Here's an example:

{{SkyrimCharacters
|image     = Ulfric Jarl.png
|race      = [[Nord (Skyrim)|Nord]]
|gender    = Male
|level     = PC×1.2 (10–50)
|class     = [[Character Classes (Skyrim)#Warrior|Warrior]]
|skills    = 
|location  = [[Palace of the Kings]], [[Windhelm (Skyrim)|Windhelm]]
|faction   = [[Stormcloaks]]
|rank      = [[Jarl]]
|services  = 
|essential = Always
|respawn   = No
|RefID     = {{ID|0001B131}}
|Base ID   = {{ID|000D0575}}
}}

This would make:

You can see this in action on almost any article, such as Ulfric Stormcloak. The equals signs should be lined up for easier editing, and the final set of brackets should be on a new line.

If you want the title on the infobox to appear as something other than the article's title, you must add a parameter for "|name = " with the desired name after the equals sign = .

You can also change the size of the image by adding "[[File:" as a prefix and "|(size)px]]" as a suffix, where (size) equals the number of pixels you want it to appear as; for example, 100, 250, 500, and so on. I explain this in more detail below.

Any information which doesn't apply or is unknown should be left blank or noted as unknown with the template {{Missing|<Game>}}, with the name of the game the topic appears in as the argument after "Missing." For example, since Ulfric is in Skyrim, you would write {{Missing|Skyrim}}.

To change which parameters actually display on the template, you would need to edit the template itself. Don't forget to also update the documentation page for it if you're adding or removing something.

This is just one example of an infobox. The infobox names are usually organized by game and then type, such as {{OnlineLocations}}, {{DaggerfallCreatures}}, {{ArenaQuests}}, and so on, and each one has its own parameters which are based on the style of each of the games.


Appearance templates

Appearance templates are often used in a bulleted list under an "Appearances" header, which should generally appear at or near the bottom of an article. They're used to indicate which games the article in question appears or is mentioned in. To indicate that something appears in Morrowind, Oblivion, and Skyrim, you'd do this:

*{{Morrowind}}
*{{Oblivion}}
*{{Skyrim}}

This would make:

They can also be used in a paragraph to link to a game, and can be shortened somewhat if necessary by placing any character as the second argument. Here's how you do it:

{{Morrowind|!}}

This would make:

Morrowind

Quote templates

It's sometimes difficult or unnecessary to paraphrase certain pieces of information from a game. When this happens, you can use a special kind of template to display a quote alongside its speaker and original source.

Quote

The {{Quote}} template is the most commonly used template to accomplish this. The first parameter is the template name; the next is the actual content of the quote; the next is the speaker of the quote, or the author of the book which it was acquired from; the next is the original source of the quote, such as the name of a book, quest, or game. Here's how you do it:

{{Quote|Sleep is for the weak.|[[Isran]]|The Elder Scrolls V: Dawnguard}}

This would make:

Quotebg
"Sleep is for the weak."
Isran[src]

Note that while brackets [[ ]] are required to make a link to the speaker, they're automatically added to whatever is placed in the source section, so adding them yourself isn't necessary.

AudioQuote

Main article: #Audio

The {{AudioQuote}} is like {{Quote}}, except that it also allows for an uploaded audio file to be played by readers and editors. It works the same way as the {{Quote}} template; the only difference is that the name of the audio file must be added as a new parameter after the quote's source. Here's how you do it:

{{AudioQuote|Sleep is for the weak.|[[Isran]]|The Elder Scrolls V: Dawnguard|Isran Audio.ogg}}

This would make:

Quotebg.png
"Sleep is for the weak."
Isran[src]

Isran Audio

If an audio file isn't added to the template, it'll simply not display the play button, making it identical in appearance to the {{Quote}} template.

For more information about how uploading and using audio is done, see below.

Stub templates

{{Stub}} is an extremely important template to many articles, as it informs editors and readers that the article is missing a certain amount of information. Arguments can be added to the template to categorize them by game and by type ({{Stub|<Game>|<Type>}}). Here's an example:

{{Stub|Arena|Quest}}

This would make:

Maintenance templates

Maintenance templates are used to note that an article needs to be rewritten, is missing information, is under construction, etc. There are multiple templates that let you write this out fairly easily.

Attention

{{Attention}} is used to note that an article requires immediate attention of editors to fix issues on it. The second parameter can be used to explain why the article needs attention and the third parameter can be altered to more specifically categorize articles needing attention. Here's an example:

{{Attention|Article should be redesigned for clarity.|Morrowind}}

This would make:

This The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind article or section is in need of immediate attention because: Yellowattentionicon 03
Article should be redesigned for clarity.
Please improve this article however you can remove this notice once finished.

Incomplete

{{Incomplete}} is used to note that an article is largely incomplete in some way. It works almost the same way as {{Attention}}, but there's no way to describe what's wrong with the article (as that's rather self-explanatory). Here's an example:

{{Incomplete|Daggerfall}}

This would make:

Delete

{{Delete}} is used to note that an article should not be on the wiki anymore. A second parameter can be added as a description of why you're tagging the article for deletion. Here's an example:

{{Delete|This article is not canonical and should be deleted.}}

This would make:

Citation

{{Citation}} is placed at the top of an article to inform readers and editors that the article is lacking sources, and should be fact-checked as soon as possible. Here's an example:

{{Citation}}

This would make:

It's often used in conjunction with {{Fact}}, which is placed in the main body of articles on unsourced claims. Here's an example:

The First Era lasted for 2920 years.{{Fact}}

This would make:

The First Era lasted for 2920 years.[source?]

Some alternatives are {{Source}} (which is actually {{Fact}}, just under a different name) and {{Cite}}, which is very similar to the Source template. Here's how you do it:

The Second Era lasted for 896 years.{{Cite}}

This would make:

The Second Era lasted for 896 years.[citation needed]

Yet another alternative is {{Conf}}, short for "Confirmation." This is generally used in a slightly different way, usually to indicate that something found in-game (such as a bug) needs corroboration by others. Here's how you do it:

Translated, the writing on this wall says, "The Third Era lasted for 433 years."{{Conf}}

This would make:

The Third Era lasted for 433 years.confirmation needed

If you happen to have a source for a statement with any of these templates attached to it, you should add the source to the article via a reference.

Construction

{{Construction}} is occasionally used by editors to note that they're doing significant work on an article. It's not necessary most of the time, but if you don't want anyone to mess with your work temporarily, then it can be very helpful. Your name should be included as the second argument to signify who placed the template on the article. Here's an example:

{{Construction|Atvelonis}}

This would make:

Redlink

{{Redlink}} is used to signify that an article has too many redlinks on it. Usually, it's placed at the top of an article if the page has at least five different redlinks. Here's an example:

{{Redlink}}

This would make:

Wikify Logo This article has an excess of redlinks in it. Attention is requested to create new articles from links to relevant topics and remove those links which lead to pages unlikely to be covered by the wiki.

Fanon

{{Fanon}} is placed at the top of an article to mark that the page contains a large amount of unofficial content made by fans, rather than developers. Here's an example:

{{Fanon}}

This would make:

There is a dispute over the canonicity of the topic or parts of it. It might not be from a published Elder Scrolls source. TESWiki is not the place to publish fan-created characters or locations. Such contributions may be more welcome at The Elder Scrolls Fanon Wiki. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. TESV Misc Quill

Merge

{{Merge}} is used to signify that an article should be merged with another one. The article that you want to merge the current page with should be added through a second parameter, and reasoning for the merge can be given through a third parameter. Here's an example:

{{Merge|Atvelonis|Perhaps this guide should be merged with my main userpage.}}

This would make:

Merge-arrows It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Atvelonis, because: Perhaps this guide should be merged with my main userpage. (Discuss)

Note that if the page isn't on the mainspace, you actually don't have to add the prefix as you would normally. The template adds it automatically, so you would simply type in the name of the page as I did.

Move

{{Move}} is used to mark that an article should be renamed to a new title. A second parameter should be added to note what the new article title should be. Here's an example:

{{Move|Atvelonis/Editing Guide}}

This would make:

Again, if the page in question isn't on the mainspace, the prefix doesn't have to be included, as it's added automatically.

Rename

{{Rename}} is used to note that a file should be renamed. A second parameter can be added to explain what the file's new name should be. Here's an example:

{{Rename|Ballin' Balgruuf.png}}

This would make:

As with {{Merge}} and {{Move}}, the prefix is added automatically, so you only have to write the name of the file destination.

Split

{{Split}} is used to suggest that an article is split into one or more different articles. Here's an example:

{{Split}}

This would make:

Imagequality

{{Imagequality}} is used on a file to note that a better version needs to be reuploaded. A second parameter is used to give a description of the file's issues, and a third parameter is used to categorize the file by game. Here's an example:

{{Imagequality|Not 3:5, not a full-body image.|Skyrim}}

This would make:

Hatnotes

Hatnotes are used to help readers navigate their way through potentially confusing articles by having links to similarly-named or related articles at the top. Here are some templates that can do this:

For

{{For}} is used very frequently on articles for things that appear in multiple games, such as an artifact or location. Although the arguments can be manipulated in a number of different ways, here's the most common usage:

{{For|2=The Elder Scrolls Wiki}}

This would make:

For other uses, see The Elder Scrolls Wiki.

The number of parameters in the template can be increased as well. Simply add a vertical line and the next number up followed by an equals sign and a plaintext link, and the template will display another link.

Confuse

{{Confuse}} works similarly to {{For}}. Here's how you use it:

{{Confuse|The Elder Scrolls Wiki}}

This would make:

Not to be confused with The Elder Scrolls Wiki.

As with {{For}}, the number of parameters in {{Confuse}} can be increased in order to show more links, however it only requires a vertical line and a plaintext link rather than a number as well.

See also

{{See also}} isn't used as frequently as {{For}} or {{Confuse}}, but it works the same way as the latter. Here's how you use it:

{{See also|The Elder Scrolls Wiki}}

This would make:

As with {{For}} and {{Confuse}}, the number of arguments in {{See also}} can be increased the same way that you do it with {{Confuse}}.

Main

{{Main}} is used to link back to a broader page of a particular topic. For example, a sublocation article may use the template to link back to the original location. Here's how you use it:

{{Main|Blackreach}}

This would make:

Main article: Blackreach

Hatnote pipe links

You can add a pipe link to a hatnote with the template {{!}}, which can be useful when linking to particular sections of an article, for example. Here's how you do it:

{{Main|Skyrim#History{{!}}Skyrim}}

This would link to the "History" section of the article, but only the page name would appear:

Main article: Skyrim

The template can also apply to certain infoboxes which only require plaintext to create a link, if you need to link to an article with a suffix.

Navbars

Navbars (Navigation Bars) are templates filled with links to similar pages, and are placed at the bottom of articles. For example, staff members are given the option to use one of these at the bottom of their userpage to help readers get a visual of who all the staff are. Here's an example of how to use it:

{{StaffNav}}

This can be seen on many staff members' userpages, as well as the administrator project page. Another example of a navbar can be seen below.

Miscellaneous templates

Disambig

{{Disambig}} is used on Disambiguation Pages to note that the article is a disambiguation page—a page that lists all articles that share a common name, to avoid confusion. Here's how you use it:

{{Disambig}}

This would make:


This is a disambiguation page—a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link refers here, consider backtracking and fixing it, so that it points directly to the intended page.


Sic

Because the content in The Elder Scrolls is written by humans (so we believe), it's subject to typos and content errors. However, because we can't realistically verify the intentions of the writers of this sort of content, we quote books, characters, and other sources in the game word-for-word, no matter the circumstances.

To prevent readers from becoming confused, however, we use the {{Sic}} template to point out things that look like typos, but actually appear that way in-game. When readers mouse over the template, a tooltip appears explaining that this content is quoted verbatim. Here's how you use it:

{{Sic|Typo|Correct word or phrase}}

This would make:

Typo [sic] [Do not change this to Correct word or phrase. This misspelled word is how it appears in-game.]

It's preferable to use {{Sicoog}} when dealing with phrases quoted from a non-game source, such as a developer text. Additionally, if you come across an extra word in a quoted phrase, use the template {{Sicrem}}.

Certain templates, such as {{Quote}}, or dialogue boxes (a class of blockquote) may break the formatting of the template, causing it to display the correct phrase in paragraph form rather than in a tooltip. You can fix this by italicizing the entire {{Sic}} template.

If you need to add a link to a word or phrase that is already using the template, you have to account for the misspelling when piping the link. This way, it'll link to the correctly-spelled article while still noting that this particular usage is incorrect. Here's an example:

{{sic|[[Windhelm|Windhlem]]|Windhelm}}

This would make:

Windhlem [sic] [Do not change this to Windhelm. This misspelled word is how it appears in-game.]

On mobile devices, where CSS does not display, the correct text in this template automatically appears in parentheses, so no extra input is required from you.

Hide

The {{Hide}} template can be used to subtly show additional information in an article. You surround text with the template, and sandwich it by placing what you what the hidden text to be as a third parameter. Here's how you do it:

{{Hide|"May the gods preserve you."|Referring to the Dragonborn.}}

This would make:

"May the gods preserve you." (Referring to the Dragonborn.)

Additionally, the template {{Hidden}} can be used the exact same was as {{Hide}}, as a replacement. However, the Hide template is usually preferred in articles as it has an instant response time, while the Hidden template has a slight delay. Here's how you do it:

{{Hidden|DOVahKiiN Fah HIN KOGaaN MU DRaaL.|Dragonborn for your blessing we pray.}}

This would make:

ID

The {{ID}} template is used in a similar way as the <code> tags, except they're used almost exclusively in infoboxes to display certain IDs, such as an NPC's RefID. Here's how you use it:

{{ID|0001B131}}

This would make:

0001B131

IDs from a DLC such as The Elder Scrolls V: Dawnguard have a unique naming system, which is explained on the xx page. To accommodate this, the {{DLC ID}} template is used instead of {{ID}} on DLC pages. Here's how you use it:

{{DLC ID|003478}}

This would make:

xx003478

Template documentation

When creating a template, you must also create a documentation page for it. Documentation pages explain how templates work, and often give examples of proper usage. To create a template documentation page, you'd use the <pre> tag and then the template name and parameters that you would put in an article, and then close it with </pre>. For example, Template:OnlineCharacters/doc.

Media

Images

Images are used to give an article's text visual support in order for readers to gain a better understanding of what is being spoken about, or how exactly something works. They're rarely used entirely in place of text, and are much more often used simply as a supplement to it.

Uploading images

To be able to use an image on the wiki, you must first upload it. Following that link takes you to the wiki's upload form, however without prior knowledge it can be confusing to do it correctly. Firstly, as the page states, your image must be allowed under our image policies.

Assuming it's appropriate for the wiki, you must copy and paste the following template into the text box titled "Summary," which is near the bottom of the page.

{{Information
|attention      = 
|description    = 
|source         = 
|author         = 
|filespecs      = 
|licensing      = 
|other versions = 
|cat artist     = 
|cat licensee   = 
|cat subject    = 
|cat type       = 
}}{{clr}}

Unlike other templates, {{Information}} requires {{Clr}} to be placed immediately after it, so that the image licenses are formatted properly.

Not every parameter of the template has to be filled out, however the four most important ones are Description, Source, Filespecs, and Licensing. Here's an example of a properly filled-out template:

{{Information
|attention      = 
|description    = An image of [[Balgruuf the Greater]] on his throne.
|source         = {{Skyrim}}.
|author         = 
|filespecs      = Cropped to 600×1000 pixels.
|licensing      = This image is from "The Elder Scrolls" series of games and qualifies as fair use.
|other versions = 
|cat artist     = 
|cat licensee   = 
|cat subject    = 
|cat type       = 
}}{{clr}}

This would make:

Atvelonis/Editing
Information
Description

An image of Balgruuf the Greater on his throne.

Source

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim.

Conversion / editing / upload information

Cropped to 600×1000 pixels.

Licensing

This image is from "The Elder Scrolls" series of games and qualifies as fair use.


Editing Guide Image Summary

An example of what you could have selected when uploading an image.

Obviously, the information about your upload may be different from this example. Fill the template out accordingly. For example, if the image you're uploading is from a website, record the web address of where you found the image under the "Source" parameter.

Once you've done that, select a license from the drop-down tab immediately below the "Summary" box. The tab is titled "Licensing."

  • If you took the image yourself, and it's from a game developed by Bethesda, you should generally select, "This image is from 'The Elder Scrolls' series of games and qualifies as fair use."
  • If you took the image yourself, and it's from a game developed by ZeniMax, you should generally select, "This image is from 'The Elder Scrolls Online' game and qualifies as fair use."
  • If you found the image on the Internet, and its usage is covered under Fair Use (meaning you're allowed to publish it elsewhere if you give proper attribution to the original source), you should generally select, "This is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License."

If your image doesn't fall under one of those categories, you probably shouldn't upload it to the wiki.

An alternative to using the drop-down tab is simply to include a specific licensing template after the {{Clr}} template, but only if you took the image yourself from one of the games. Each game has these templates for large topics, such as {{SkyrimCharacterImages}}, {{DaggerfallQuestImages}}, {{MorrowindBookImages}}, and so on. If you use this method instead, don't select anything from the drop-down tab.

Lastly, you must click on the "Choose File" button in the "Source file" section of the page. Once there, locate the image on your computer and select it to be uploaded. Then, scroll to the bottom of the upload page and click "Upload file."

At this point, you'll be taken to the file location of the image on the wiki. Copy the name you gave the image, and then edit the appropriate article and add the image.

Multiple-upload

If you happen to have a large number of images that you'd like to upload to the wiki, there's a similar page to help you upload larger quantities of images more efficiently. While the regular upload page is at Special:Upload, if you want to upload multiple images at the same time then you would use Special:MultipleUpload.

MultipleUpload works the same was as the regular Upload page, for the most part. However, you may select up to twenty images from your computer instead of only one. The text you place in the Summary box will appear the same way for each image once it's uploaded.

It may take a few seconds longer than normal to actually upload the images if there are more than a few of them, and a small "percent complete" bar may show up in your browser to show you how much progress has been made during the upload. Once the images have been uploaded, you'll be taken to a list of each image you uploaded. Clicking on the name of an image listed there will take you to the file location of that image on the wiki.

Formatting images

There are a lot of ways you can format images. The most common way is to do so in an infobox. Using a sample infobox, here's how you would write a file name to make the image appear in an infobox:

{{SkyrimLocations
|image = Whiterun Skyrim.png
}}

This would make:

Some older templates may require that you use the full formatting for an image to appear instead of simply the image's name, which is explained in the next example.

The size of the image may be adjusted if an image is too small or too large. Here's how you do it:

Use any number smaller than 250px to make the image smaller. For example:

{{SkyrimLocations
|image = [[File:Whiterun Skyrim.png|100px]]
}}

Use any number larger than 250px to make the image larger. For example:

{{SkyrimLocations
|image = [[File:Whiterun Skyrim.png|300px]]
}}

Galleries

If you have a large number of images that can't be placed in the main body of an article, you can use a gallery to group them together in one section, usually near the end of the page. You can also add captions to the images with a second parameter. Here's how you do it:

<gallery>
TESIV Location Goldcoast 2.png|The Gold Coast in Cyrodiil.
TESSI Location Mania.png|Mania in the Shivering Isles.
ESO Moonmont.png|Moonmont in Valenwood.
</gallery>

This would make:

You can also manipulate the formatting of galleries to make them appear differently, such as in a slideshow. Here's an example:

<gallery type="slideshow" widths="500" position="center">
TESIV Location Goldcoast 2.png|The Gold Coast in Cyrodiil.
TESSI Location Mania.png|Mania in the Shivering Isles.
ESO Moonmont.png|Moonmont in Valenwood.
</gallery>

This would make the following slideshow, with the images centered and appearing at 500 pixels in size:

  • The Gold Coast in Cyrodiil.
  • Mania in the Shivering Isles.
  • Moonmont in Valenwood.

Additionally, you can also use a slider to display images, although this isn't used on articles, rather only on the Main Page. Here's an example:

<gallery type="slider">
TESIV Location Goldcoast 2.png|The Gold Coast|link=Gold Coast (Oblivion)|linktext=In Cyrodiil.
TESSI Location Mania.png|Mania|link=Mania|linktext=In the Shivering Isles.
ESO Moonmont.png|Moonmont|link=Moonmont (Online)|linktext=In Valenwood.
</gallery>

This would make:

The second parameter controls the large heading that each image has, "linktext" controls the smaller description underneath it, and "link" allows you to make the image link to an article when it's clicked on. There are a lot more tags you can apply to galleries in order to change the way they appear, which you can view on this page.

Audio

Blockquotes

Various forms of blockquotes are used to document dialogue, among other things.

Classic blockquotes

This format isn't used much, but it's the most basic type of blockquote, and has no background.

<blockquote>
This is a classic blockquote.
</blockquote>

This would make:

This is a classic blockquote.

Character blockquotes

Character blockquotes also aren't used very frequently, but they're generally used to strongly emphasize the information within them. Here's how you make one:

<blockquote class="char">
This is a character blockquote.
</blockquote>

This would make:

This is a character blockquote.

Dividing blockquotes

In terms of dialogue, dividing blockquotes are used to document conversations between two or more characters (NPCs). The speaker's name goes in bold, while their response is not bolded. This is how you make a dividing blockquote:

<div class="blockquote">
This is a dividing blockquote.</div>

This would make:

This is a dividing blockquote.

Or, if it's italicized using two apostrophes on either side of the text, it would make this:

This is an italicized dividing blockquote.

Note that if there are multiple paragraphs in a blockquote, they must each be italicized; it doesn't carry over through multiple paragraphs. For example:

<div class="blockquote">
''This is the first paragraph of an italicized dividing blockquote.''

''This is the second paragraph of an italicized dividing blockquote.''</div>

This would make:

This is the first paragraph of an italicized dividing blockquote.

This is the second paragraph of an italicized dividing blockquote.

Dialogue boxes

Dialogue boxes are used to document conversations between the player and a character (NPC). The player's dialogue goes in bold, while the character's response is not bolded. Here's how you make a dialogue box:

<div class="diabox">
'''This is the player's dialogue.''' ''"This is the response."''
</div>

This would make:

This is the player's dialogue. "This is the response."

Half blockquotes

Blockquotes can also be cut in half for aesthetic purposes. Here's how to make a halved character blockquote:

<blockquote class="char-half">
This is a halved character blockquote.</blockquote>

This would make:

This is a halved character blockquote.

Alternatively, you can cut a dividing blockquote in half. If italicized, it'll act the same way as a regular dividing blockquote.

<div class="blockquote-half">
This is a halved dividing blockquote.</div>

This would make:

This is a halved dividing blockquote.

Dialogue boxes can also be cut in half. Here's how you do it:

<div class="diabox-half">
'''This is the player's dialogue.''' ''"This is the response."''
</div>

This would make:

This is the player's dialogue. "This is the response."

Book container

The content of books is generally placed in a specialized blockquote called a book container. Here's an example:

<div class="bookContainer">
"How did I get here?"

"The guards, [[Cyrus (Redguard)|Cyrus]], you don't remember?"
</div>

This would make:

"How did I get here?"

"The guards, Cyrus, you don't remember?"

Tables

Tables are used to store large amounts of information in an orderly, readable fashion.

Table formatting

The code used to begin a table is an opening brace followed by a vertical line: {|. Headers are noted on a new line with an exclamation point !, and data rows are noted similarly, with a vertical line |. A line break can be made with a vertical line followed by a hyphen |-. A table can be ended with a vertical line followed by a closing brace |}.

The class of a table must always be defined in it for it to format properly. Likewise, you can add inline CSS to style the table in particular ways, such as changing the table's width or centering the text within it.

Wikitables

Some basic classes for regular wikitables are as follows:

  • Wikitable – The standard wikitable class.
  • Wikitable sortable – Allows the reader to sort the table by column.
  • Wikitable highlight – Rows are highlighted when the cursor is moved over them.
  • Wikitable sortable highlight – Combines the functionality of the sortable and highlight classes.

Here are some examples:

Wikitable:

{|class="wikitable" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
!Header 1
!Header 2
!Header 3
|-
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|-
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|-
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|}

Wikitable sortable:

{|class="wikitable sortable" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
!Header 1
!Header 2
!Header 3
|-
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|-
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|-
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|}

Wikitable highlight:

{|class="wikitable highlight" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
!Header 1
!Header 2
!Header 3
|-
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|-
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|-
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|}

Wikitable sortable highlight:

{|class="wikitable sortable highlight" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
!Header 1
!Header 2
!Header 3
|-
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|-
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|-
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|}

This would make:

Wikitable:

Header 1 Header 2 Header 3
Row 1 Data Row 1 Data Row 1 Data
Row 2 Data Row 2 Data Row 2 Data
Row 3 Data Row 3 Data Row 3 Data

Wikitable sortable:

Header 1 Header 2 Header 3
Row 1 Data Row 1 Data Row 1 Data
Row 2 Data Row 2 Data Row 2 Data
Row 3 Data Row 3 Data Row 3 Data

Wikitable highlight:

Header 1 Header 2 Header 3
Row 1 Data Row 1 Data Row 1 Data
Row 2 Data Row 2 Data Row 2 Data
Row 3 Data Row 3 Data Row 3 Data

Wikitable sortable highlight:

Header 1 Header 2 Header 3
Row 1 Data Row 1 Data Row 1 Data
Row 2 Data Row 2 Data Row 2 Data
Row 3 Data Row 3 Data Row 3 Data

The style="width: 100%; is inline CSS which sets the table to occupy the entire width of the article, and the text-align: center;" finalizes the styling by centering the text in all the rows. Specific rows can be styled independently of other rows by adding this CSS before the text of the row with, for example, the code |style="text-align:center;"|Row 1 Data.

Collapsible tables

A collapsible table is a type of wikitable that can be opened and closed by the reader by use of the wikitable mw-collapsible mw-collapsed class. Here's an example:

{|class="wikitable mw-collapsible mw-collapsed" width="100%" data-expandtext="show" data-collapsetext="hide"
!Click to show
|-
|Content
|}

This would make:

Click to show
Content

The width="100%" code sets the table to occupy the entire width of the article, and the data-expandtext-"show" data-collapsetext="hide" changes the text on the open/close button from "Expand" and "Collapse" to "Show" and "Hide," respectively.

Qtables

There are several different kinds of "qtables," which is an alternative if a standard wikitable doesn't suit your needs. Qtables are organized by game class, which usually just changes its color.

These tables format identically to normal wikitables, but are generally used for displaying information that is not particularly stat-heavy. The different game classes can be seen to the left.

The code for these particular tables can be found in Wikia.css. For various reasons, some DLCs do not have their own qtable color.

Here's an example:

{|class="skqtable" style="width: 100%;"
!Quote
!Topic
!Audio
|-
|''"Yes? Make it quick, I'm a busy man."''
|General
|{{Audio|filename=Ulfric Quote General 1.ogg}}
|-
|''"Keep your brother, and he'll keep you."''
|General
|{{Audio|filename=Ulfric Quote General 2.ogg}}
|-
|''"Talos watch over you."''
|General
|{{Audio|filename=Ulfric Quote General 3.ogg}}
|}

This would make:

Quote Topic Audio
"Yes? Make it quick, I'm a busy man." General
Ulfric Quote General 1
"Keep your brother, and he'll keep you." General
Ulfric Quote General 2
"Talos watch over you." General
Ulfric Quote General 3

Changing the skqtable to, for example, obqtable would render the same result, but in a different color:

Quote Topic Audio
"Yes? Make it quick, I'm a busy man." General
Ulfric Quote General 1
"Keep your brother, and he'll keep you." General
Ulfric Quote General 2
"Talos watch over you." General
Ulfric Quote General 3

Likewise, changing it to mwqtable would yield another similar result:

Quote Topic Audio
"Yes? Make it quick, I'm a busy man." General
Ulfric Quote General 1
"Keep your brother, and he'll keep you." General
Ulfric Quote General 2
"Talos watch over you." General
Ulfric Quote General 3

As stated previously, every class would give this table a different color. Of course, you want to match the color with the game that the information is from, so in an article you would only use skqtable for the above examples, as the dialogue is from Ulfric Stormcloak in Skyrim.

As with regular wikitables, you can also add things like rowspan, colspan, etc. to the table in order to format it differently. This allows for much more complex tables than the above ones; for example, quest journals (example) and large data tables (example) sometimes make use of more complicated formatting.

Additional table formatting

It's possible to have a row in one column extend to multiple rows in the next column with the rowspan parameter, and to have a column extend over multiple rows with the colspan parameter. The former is currently used on the table for displaying past Members of the Month, for example. Here's how you do it:

Multi-row:

{|class="wikitable" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
!Header 1
!Header 2
!Header 3
|-
|rowspan="3"|Rows 1-3 Data
|Row 1 Data
|Row 1 Data
|-
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|-
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|}

Multi-column:

{|class="wikitable" style="width: 100%; text-align: center;"
!Header 1
!Header 2
!Header 3
|-
|colspan="3"|Columns 1-2 Data
|-
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|Row 2 Data
|-
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|Row 3 Data
|}

This would make:

Multi-row:

Header 1 Header 2 Header 3
Rows 1-3 Data Row 1 Data Row 1 Data
Row 2 Data Row 2 Data
Row 3 Data Row 3 Data

Multi-column:

Header 1 Header 2 Header 3
Columns 1-2 Data
Row 2 Data Row 2 Data Row 2 Data
Row 3 Data Row 3 Data Row 3 Data

Miscellaneous

Talk pages

Renaming pages

Preload templates

Game files

Construction Set

Creation Kit

See also


Note to self—add these:
  • Includeonly/noinclude
  • Audio
  • Images
    • Licensing
  • Fonts?
  • File [[: link
  • Same-page links, multiple of same header

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.